Auric Solar Teams Up With Tree Utah

More than 100 volunteers from Utah’s largest solar provider assist with restoration efforts at Parley’s Historic Nature Park

SALT LAKE CITY (Sept. 19, 2015) – Volunteers along with the Auric Solar team and Tree Utah planted 750 trees Saturday morning at Parleys Historic Nature Park.

More than 100 volunteers spent three hours working to plant the seedlings throughout the popular park, which includes off-leash dog access.

“This area has been loved to death,” said Nate Orbock, Tree Utah’s planting coordinator. “We are focused on re-vegetating areas like this that are so important to nature within the city. Planting trees with Auric Solar at Parleys Historic Nature Park will help us with this critical restoration.”

Giving back to the community by planting trees was a no brainer for Auric Solar Co-Founder Jess Phillips. Trees and solar both provide environmental and social benefits, including improving Utah’s air quality.

“Our business of providing solar is all about making sure we leave our world a better place to live in for generations to come,” Phillips said.

The average solar powered home reduces greenhouse gas emissions the equivalent of planting more than 100 trees annually. Solar power systems derive clean, pure energy from the sun. Installing solar panels on homes and businesses helps combat greenhouse gas emissions and reduces our collective dependence on fossil fuel. Solar power is the fastest growing source of renewable energy in America.

As Utah’s largest solar provider, Auric Solar has installed more than 10 megawatts of solar energy in Utah and Idaho the past six years – the environmental equivalent of planting 200,000 trees per year.

Tree Utah’s mission is to improve Utah’s quality of life for present and future generations by enhancing the environment through tree planting, stewardship and education. Since its founding in 1990, the organization has planted 350,000 trees with the help of 150,000 volunteers.

 

To participate in the next Tree Utah planting, visit www.treeutah.org.